Ask a GI Dietitian: Staying Healthy This Summer

by Samantha Woodward, Digestive Disease Institute **

Debra Clancy, RD, CD, is a registered dietitian who works with patients within Virginia Mason’s Digestive Disease Institute providing nutrition information and tools for making positive changes in their lives. In a recent chat, she gave us the inside scoop on how to make healthy choices when you are out and about this summer and surrounded by meat in buns and ice cream on cones.

If I’m trying to stay healthy this summer, what types of foods should I eat more of and what foods should I avoid?

Clancy: Instead of avoiding some of your favorite summer foods, modify their ingredients and eat smaller portions. Make small, but significant, changes to summer food recipes like decreasing fat and sugar content by using low-fat products or decreasing the amount of sugar in a recipe.

A healthy summertime meal from the grill.

A healthy summertime meal from the grill.

The typical summer gathering with family and friends lasts for several hours, so try going back to the buffet more often, each time taking small amounts of food instead of overfilling your plate on a single trip. Choose side-dishes, salads that have a vinaigrette dressing, or very little mayonnaise, and meat items that have the skin removed or have minimal sauce covering them.

At your next ballgame, don’t order deep-fried foods – or try to split a dish with someone. Other healthy choices include ordering a smaller size beverage or water. When it’s time for dessert, try a small amount, scrape off the frosting and eat just the cake or choose a fruit dish instead. Choose mineral waters or flavored waters instead of sugar-sweetened beverages.

Don’t forget to exercise by walking and participating in activities that increase your heart rate for at least 30 minutes daily.

What food choices can I make to help prevent indigestion?

Clancy: If you are prone to indigestion, the symptoms are often increased when a large meal is spicy, acidic or high in fat. Spicy foods may be the BBQ sauce on the grilled chicken breast. Tomatoes are examples of acidic foods. High fat foods include cream dishes, deep-fried items and salads with lots of mayonnaise.

Follow these simple tips to minimize heartburn:

  • Eat green salads with minimal dressing, skinless turkey and chicken, fish and seafood, melons and bananas, and root vegetables, such as carrots and potato.
  • Choose low-fat dairy products as supplements to the meal, not as the main item.
  • Eat small amounts of food over a number of hours during the event.
  • Remain sitting upright for one to two hours after each meal.
  • Avoid carbonated sodas, alcohol, chocolate and large amounts of caffeine.
  • Weight loss often improves indigestion symptoms and decreases the progression to GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Indigestion becomes GERD when your discomfort lasts for a longer period of time or when it occurs with each meal. If you are following the above suggestions and your symptoms persist, it’s best to seek medical advice.

When it’s your turn to be the host this summer, search online for healthy alternative recipes for your favorite foods:

Enjoy your summertime BBQ’s and events!