Yes, You Need a Flu Shot This Year — And Here’s Why

**By Christopher Baliga, MD**

Flu season is fast approaching, which means it may be harder for you to tell the difference between a flu symptom and symptoms associated with COVID-19. Those affected with either illness have the potential to run a fever, feel sluggish, and develop a cough and body aches. The good news is, you can protect yourself and others from both diseases by wearing your mask and getting a flu vaccination.

With so many myths and rumors floating around about whether the flu shot is necessary this year, it’s important to listen only to medical experts on this matter. We’re here to provide the facts you need to help keep yourself and those around you healthy.

Since I wear a mask, do I still need a flu shot?

Yes. While masks are helpful in reducing the spread of pathogens, they are not as effective for preventing the flu. By combining mask wearing with  the flu shot, you will lower your risk of catching the flu while protecting yourself from COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses. Just as important, getting a flu shot means you are less likely to spread the disease to others.

Flu.signWon’t a flu shot increase my chances of catching the coronavirus?

There is no evidence to suggest that getting a flu shot will impact your risk of contracting COVID-19. But what we know for certain is that a flu shot will reduce your risk of getting the flu.

Does wearing a mask protect my immune system?

Wearing a mask has no effect on your immune system itself. It does reduce your risk of catching COVID-19 by up to 80%, but wearing a mask does not change your immune system on its own.

Some of us might remember the days when people were opposed to government mandates requiring the use of seatbelts in cars. Similarly, we’ve seen pushback against wearing masks in public. Just like wearing your seatbelt can save your life, masks help reduce your chances of catching COVID-19, while the flu shot reduces your risk of contracting the flu (or reduces the severity of illness if you do get sick). But unlike a seatbelt which only really protects you, masking and getting a flu shot also helps protect those around you.

If you’re in search of where to get a flu shot this year, consider visiting a Virginia Mason drive-thru/drive-up location, open through Oct. 23. Find more information on the location closest to you here.


Baliga, ChrisChristopher Baliga, MD, is board-certified by the American Academy of Internal Medicine in infectious diseases and internal medicine. He practices at Virginia Mason Seattle Medical Center. Dr. Baliga specializes in infectious diseases, HIV/AIDS care and travel health. 

Tips for Summer Travel During COVID-19

**By Chia Wang, MD**

Summer is underway and many of us are feeling restless and ready to get out and enjoy the warm weather. Some of us are itching to see family and friends whom we may not have seen for a while. But is it safe to travel this summer amidst the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic? There is no question that in terms of catching the virus, isolating at home is the safest thing to do. However, each person must weigh their individual risks, and for those who are very elderly, or who have underlying risk conditions, staying at home until there is a vaccine or until rates of transmission are very low is still the best advice.

To travel or not this summer also depends on where you are traveling to. Personally, I would be hesitant to travel from a place where viral transmission rates are low to one where transmission rates are high. Conversely, if traveling from somewhere where transmission rates are high, you would want to consider carefully whether you would be putting others at risk by traveling, and take steps to mitigate any risk, such as bringing your own food and water and monitoring for symptoms. I would also caution against traveling to a place where being able to practice physical distancing would be difficult, such as to a dense urban area or visiting someone with a very small apartment.

People must take into account their own risk profiles, as well as their own comfort level with risk.  –Dr. Chia Wang

Here are some things to keep in mind if you choose to travel this summer:

Couple tandem bikeConsider your mode of transportation

Travel by car is generally preferred to plane travel, because you have more control over your surroundings, and you are not breathing the same air as many strangers for hours on end. That is not to say that plane travel is unsafe in terms of COVID-19, but car travel is generally safer. However, if you need to travel cross-country, and traveling by car would involve multiple hotel stays and eating at many restaurants, particularly if traveling through virus-hot spots, then plane travel may actually be safer than car travel.

Choose lodging that minimizes contact with others

The virus does not seem to be transmitted as easily outdoors as indoors, so choosing hotels or lodges with doors that open to the outside, instead of into a hallway, are also choices that may make you safer. Avoid lodging that requires you to use an elevator. The less contact you have with other people, whether other travelers, or staff at hotels and restaurants, the safer. Staying in private homes through services like Airbnb, staying in cabins, tents or RVs are all ways that you enjoy less risky travel.

Wearing a mask while indoors, or when around people while outdoors, is one safety measure that is recommended. Washing hands frequently, and avoiding touching the face, are also important.

Bring the appropriate supplies

Masks and hand sanitizer are the most important things to bring when leaving the home for most reasons. For road trips, bringing things that will allow you to minimize contact with others is helpful, such as extra food and drinks, and day trip supplies including sunblock, bandages and pain relievers such as Tylenol.

Think outside the box – or just think outside

Camping, hiking, biking, and outdoor adventuring seem like activities that will allow families to adhere best to physical distancing guidelines. Sitting outdoors at a scenic location reading a book or just nature-gazing can also be a nice change of pace for those who are tired of being cooped up. For those who prefer the comforts of home rather than sleeping on the ground and using a Porta-potty while camping, “glamping” may be a great option—with beds and flush toilets and hot showers, but still in tents that are well-distanced from each other and lots of fresh air. Overall, for travel this summer, trips that emphasize time outdoors are the safest. People must take into account their own risk profiles, as well as their own comfort level with risk. Until transmission rates have dropped much further than they have so far—basically until there is a vaccine—the safest option for most people is still to stay home.


Dr.WangChia Wang, MD, is an infectious disease specialist at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle. She is board-certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine. Dr. Wang also specializes in HIV/AIDS care and travel health.