Warm Weather Stresses Your Heart: Tips to Stay Cool

**By Mariko W. Harper, MD, MS, FACC**

Did you know that warm weather can put stress on your heart? When temperatures rise, the heart must work harder to keep the body cool. This isn’t great news for those living with heart disease because these individuals will have a harder time adapting, leading to a greater risk for heat stroke than their heart-healthy peers.

Additionally, when the body sweats to cool itself down, you tend to lose water and important minerals, like sodium and potassium. These minerals are necessary for muscle contraction and maintenance of fluid levels. Certain common heart medications, like diuretics, beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers, can also affect how the body responds in warm weather.

Don’t worry, though, as this doesn’t mean you or your family cannot enjoy some fun in the sun! Here are a few tips to protect yourself and your heart when the temperature starts to heat up.

Before engaging in vigorous exercise, consult with your physician

Unless you are an avid exerciser, it’s always a good idea to check with your physician before attempting vigorous exercise in the heat. You might be taking up a new sport or hobby, or perhaps it’s just been a while since you’ve had a check-up. Either way, schedule a quick appointment to get your doctor’s approval. You can also consider shaking up your workout by doing it earlier in the morning or in the evenings when it’s not as hot outside.

Drink plenty of water, even when you don’t feel thirsty

Many of us struggle to get enough water throughout the day, so it’s a good idea to find ways to help remind yourself to stay hydrated. This might mean filling up a large water bottle that you can carry around all day or setting reminders on your phone. You can also “eat your water” by enjoying fruits and vegetables like watermelon and cucumber.  

Avoid being in the sun during the hottest time of day

This one might be a no-brainer, but the best way to prevent overheating is to avoid being in the sun when it’s the hottest, typically from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. If you must be in the sun during these hours, cover your skin with light-colored and lightweight fabrics, such as cotton, and find shade as often as you can.

Avoid alcohol and caffeine

Both alcohol and caffeine can contribute to dehydration. Stick with water and other non-caffeinated beverages.

Heat presents danger for anyone, but particularly those with heart conditions. If you have a serious heart condition such as congestive heart failure, it is best advised to limit your exposure to extremes of temperature.  If you start to feel dizzy, nauseous or disoriented, get out of the heat immediately, apply cool water to your skin and drink water to rehydrate. If you don’t start to feel better, call your doctor, or seek care immediately.

By remembering these tips and taking extra caution when outside in the sun, a summer of heart-healthy fun and fitness awaits you! If you have any concerns about your heart or overall health, there is no time better than now to reach out to your doctor prior to engaging in new activities. 


Mariko Harper, MD is board-certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular disease, nuclear cardiology and echocardiography. She practices at Virginia Mason Heart Institute. Dr. Harper specializes in general cardiology, echocardiography, nuclear cardiology and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. 

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