Get the Pelvic ‘Floor-One-One’

**By Kathleen Kobashi, MD, FACS, FPMRS**

While pelvic floor health disorders can seem alienating, it is important to know that you’re not alone and there are a variety of ways to treat bothersome symptoms.

The pelvic floor is a group of muscles in the pelvic region, that can be described as a “hammock” of ligaments that sling between the pubic bone in the front and the tailbone in the back. For women, these muscles and ligaments work to support and control the uterus, vagina, bowel and bladder; whereas for men, they support just the bowel and bladder.

As a multidisciplinary team, the members of the Pelvic Floor Center at Virginia Mason treat virtually every pelvic floor health issue that can be experienced by both men and women. In this article we’ll dive into common health problems associated with the pelvic floor and why maintaining pelvic floor health is so important. Pelvic floor disorders can become huge quality-of-life issues that can interfere with our daily activities. It is vital for us to be aware that there are successful, minimally invasive treatment options available.

Common health issues associated with the pelvic floor

When it comes to pelvic floor health issues, there are several key terms to remember, like incontinence and prolapse. Incontinence is the lack of control of bladder or bowel function resulting in leakage, while prolapse is the displacement or dropping of pelvic organs through a weak pelvic floor, much like a hernia. There are other pelvic floor disorders that may result in the opposite problem of difficulty emptying the bladder or bowel.

Mother and daughter drinking coffeeThe two most common forms of urinary/bladder incontinence are stress and urgency leakage. Stress incontinence is the involuntary release of urine from coughing, sneezing or other similar actions and is commonly (but not exclusively) experienced by women who have had vaginal delivery of babies. Aging, genetics and gravity can also play a role. Conversely, urgency incontinence is exactly as it sounds – when nature calls, you don’t always have a say in when you answer, and it is urgent. This form of incontinence can be caused by the consumption of dietary irritants, such as coffee or wine, that aggravate the bladder, as well as hormonal changes that make the bladder more irritable. In men, urgency can also be related to prostate enlargement.

Fecal/bowel incontinence (aka accidental bowel leakage) is an involuntary loss of bowel control that can result in stool abruptly leaking from the rectum. Disorders associated with bowel function can range from constipation to complete loss of control of the bowel, and everything in between.

Prolapse occurs when pelvic organs – such as the bladder, uterus, bowels, vagina or rectum – drop down into or outside of the anus or vaginal canal. Prolapse can be due to a number of issues, including pregnancy, childbirth, obesity, chronic respiratory issues, constipation and cancer in the pelvic region.

Signs to look out for and when to see your doctor

If you’re concerned you might be dealing with a pelvic floor problem, here are a few signs and symptoms:

  • Urinary/bladder incontinence – symptoms can include leakage of urine with coughing, sneezing or exercise, and can also be associated with a sudden, intense and often uncontrollable urge to urinate. Other lower urinary tract symptoms may include frequent urination, slow or dribbling streams of urine or the inability to completely empty your bladder.
  • Fecal/bowl issues – symptoms can include chronic bloating, constipation, diarrhea or involuntary loss of fecal matter.
  • Pelvic organ prolapse – symptoms can include a feeling of fullness in the pelvic floor or vagina, a feeling that something is “falling” out of the anus or vagina, discomfort with sexual intercourse, urinary or fecal incontinence, a sense of trapping of stool or the inability to completely empty your bowels.

It’s important to note that any combination of the symptoms above can occur.

The importance of pelvic floor health

Given the critical bowel, bladder and sexual functions these muscles support, keeping your pelvic floor healthy and strong is crucial. There are a variety of exercises that can be done to improve overall pelvic floor health and functionality, with some of the more common ones being Kegels. Working your pelvic floor regularly is especially important for women in order to minimize the risk of developing prolapse, incontinence or other pelvic health issues that stem from pregnancy or aging.

If you’re experiencing any one or combination of the symptoms discussed above for an extended period of time, it may be time to call and arrange a visit with your doctor. From there, they can work with you to decide your best course of treatment, whether that’s pelvic floor therapy or proceeding with some tests that can help identify the root cause of your problem and facilitate treatment planning.


Kathleen.KobashiKathleen Kobashi, MD, FACS, FPMRS is board-certified in urology with a subspecialty certification in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery. She is the section head of Urology and director of the  Pelvic Floor Center at Virginia Mason. Dr. Kobashi is a urologist/urogynecologist who specializes in the treatment of pelvic floor disorders, including urinary and bowel incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and urinary tract fistulas, with expertise in pelvic floor reconstruction through open and robotic surgery.

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