Q&A with a Family Doctor: Tips for a Happy, Healthy, Safe Birth

There are lots of articles out there about birthing styles, the best ways to give birth and how to prepare for birth. However, despite what they might tell you, it turns out there is not one “right” way to give birth.

We sat down with Dr. Juliana Wynne, a family doctor at Virginia Mason Edmonds Family Medicine, to talk about some of the choices when it comes to giving birth, common questions her patients ask her and any advice when it comes to handling the unexpected … when you’re expecting.

What are some ways patients can prepare for birth?
The best way patients can prepare for birth is by educating themselves. I recommend that patients bring up any questions they have about it with their provider. Patients can take birth classes – these can be accessed virtually, including at Virginia Mason. Expecting parents can talk to friends and family about their experiences. I recommend finding reliable resources about birth, such as the book “The Mommy Docs’ Ultimate Guide to Pregnancy and Birth” by Yvonne Bohn, MD; Allison Hill, MD; Alane Park, MD and Melissa Jo Peltier. In general, I think it’s important to feel informed going into labor.

What are some common questions your patients have? 
Patients often ask me about my role as an FM/OB (family medicine obstetrics) provider. I am a family doctor that provides prenatal, obstetric, postpartum and newborn/pediatric care. At my office, patients tend to see one prenatal provider. Our goal is to be the provider that is present for their labor and delivery in the hospital. I believe that the biggest benefit of seeing an FM/OB provider is the continuity of care, from the first prenatal visit, to the baby’s birth, to the newborn care in the office and the post-partum visit, to pediatric care as the child continues to grow older. I really get to know the patient and her baby, and often get to know the whole family. This leads to a whole-person and Ethnic toddler listening to her mothers pregnant tummywhole-family approach to care. 

Patients also ask about who will be in the room with them during the birth. Generally, the people in the room include their partner, me, their nurse, and a nurse for their baby. If needed, we have additional support staff available at all times, including additional nurses, the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) team, and an obstetrician on call.

 What birthing styles are out there? 
Just like every mom and baby is unique and different, so is every birth. There is no one right way or style to give birth. As a provider who cares for women who are delivering babies, my goals are to do everything to ensure that mom and baby are safe, and that mom feels informed and in control.

How do you help moms choose the best birthing style for them? 
Again, there is no one right way to give birth and there are many options when making a plan. There are options for who you see for your care. You can see a midwife, an obstetrician, or a family medicine physician that does prenatal care, like myself and my colleagues at Virginia Mason Edmonds Family Medicine. There are options for where you give birth. You can give birth in a hospital, in a birth center, and some women choose to give birth at home. There are different people to lean on for support during labor, whether it be your partner, family, friends, doula, provider, nurse or a combination of all of these people. There are different ways to cope with pain during labor, which include utilizing a birthing ball, a hot bath, movement (walking, dancing), utilizing your breath, using nitrous oxide which is available in some birth locations, IV pain medicine or an epidural. When it comes to the actual delivery, there are also different positions to try.

A birth may not go as expected. How can patients prepare for this? 
It is helpful to keep an open mind going into your labor. Sometimes our plans change. For example, I hoped very much to have a natural vaginal delivery myself. However, after a long labor, I had a healthy baby via cesarean section. I felt that I did everything in my control to have a vaginal delivery, and yet was prepared for the possibility of needing a cesarean section (my little one was projected to be 9 pounds, and he was!). 

It’s important to share your goals with your provider so that we can best help you achieve them and advocate for you. Helping you to achieve your goals is our goal. 


Juliana WynneJuliana Wynne, DO is a family medicine doctor who provides prenatal, obstetric, women’s health, adult and pediatric care at Virginia Mason Edmonds Family Medicine. She is board certified by the American Board of Family Medicine.

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