Boost Self-Care by Knowing Your Numbers

**By Teera Crawford, MD**

When you think about self-care, you might think of yoga, meditation and journaling – not measuring your blood pressure.

However, tracking your critical health numbers – blood pressure, cholesterol, hemoglobin A1C and waist circumference – goes a long way in ensuring both a healthy body and healthy life. Staying on top of these will help you take charge of your health, especially as we continue to navigate the pandemic.

Of course, this is easier said than done, and learning how to identify and keep your numbers in check requires a bit of work up front. However, it is advantageous to keep up to date with this practice in the long run. Read on to understand what these numbers mean, why they’re important and how to incorporate monitoring them into your self-care routine.

Blood PressureBlood pressure

Measuring your blood pressure consists of familiarizing yourself with two numbers: systolic and diastolic. Systolic tells you how much pressure your blood is exerting on the blood vessels with each heartbeat, and diastolic tells you how much pressure your blood is exerting when your heart is relaxing. For reference, an elevated blood pressure is one that is greater than 120/80. Measuring blood pressure can be done from the comfort of your home and is as easy as purchasing and using a quality blood pressure cuff. Pro tip: when you buy a new blood pressure cuff, it’s a good idea to have it checked against the blood pressure cuff used at your doctor’s office to ensure its accuracy.

Total cholesterol

Cholesterol is a fat-like substance that your liver makes and is found throughout all of the cells in your body. Maintaining a certain level of cholesterol is important to keep your body functioning, but an elevated total cholesterol (a measure of the total amount of cholesterol in your blood) is more harmful than helpful. For reference, an elevated total cholesterol is one that clocks in at greater than 200. Obtaining this number requires blood tests done in a laboratory and should be checked at your doctor’s office every five years or so.

If your cholesterol errs on the higher side, or you have a family history of high cholesterol, you’ll want to get this checked a bit more frequently. Work with your doctor to set up the appropriate plan for you to keep this in check.

 Hemoglobin A1C

The hemoglobin A1C test measures the amount of blood sugar (glucose) attached to hemoglobin, or protein in your red blood cells. Hemoglobin A1C is a type of blood test typically used to screen for diabetes and can tell you your average blood sugar level over the three months prior. For reference, a measurement greater than 5.7% indicates a prediabetic range and means you’re at a higher risk for developing diabetes, while a measurement greater than 6.5% means you have diabetes. Check in with your doctor to help develop the right plan for you to stay on top of your hemoglobin A1C.

Waist circumference

Waist circumference is exactly what it sounds like – the measurement of your waist, which can fortunately be conducted at home with a flexible tape measure. Starting at the top of your hip bone, wrap the tape measurer around your body until it reaches the starting point. For reference, your waist circumference should typically be less than 40 inches for men and less than 35 inches for women. Pro tip: try to relax your body when measuring your waist to produce the most accurate reading.

Elevations in any of these numbers can lead to cardiac, vascular and other organ abnormalities over time, and Overweight Woman Measuring Waist in Gymmonitoring and staying on top of them is vital to healthy living. According to the CDC, heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. and elevated numbers increase your risk of developing heart disease.

Frequent exercise is a surefire way to keep everything under control but unfortunately during the pandemic, going to the gym is not an option for all. Alternatives to the gym include online exercise videos that can be done at home or getting outside for a walk or run around your neighborhood.

In addition to exercise, it’s important to communicate about these measures openly, honestly and frequently with your doctor to set yourself up on the right path to healthier living. Pairing these efforts with your other self-care methods of choice will keep you living your best life.


Teera.CrawfordTeera Crawford, MD, is board-certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and specializes in women’s health, preventive care, diabetes and weight management. Dr. Crawford practices at Virginia Mason Lynnwood Medical Center

 

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